Wednesday, November 4, 2009

Happy Birthday, Mother!

(Orphan Sunday, 11/8, makes me think of our adoption story, which begins here.)

Part 6 (preview!)

Today is my mother's 88th birthday.

You already know the end of our adoption story, don't you? We adopted. So it won't be a spoiler if I skip ahead a couple of episodes so I can recount how Mother responded when we told her we were hoping to adopt . . . a girl . . . a little African-American baby.

Here are excerpts from the email I sent her:

I have some news that you probably never thought you’d hear again from us. We think we’re going to have a baby. An adopted one this time. A girl this time. You’re expecting another grandchild!


I was inspired by having a mother who had her last baby at only about a year younger than I am now. (I thought that since menopause hasn’t hit yet, God also thought that I wasn’t too old for a baby. A friend said, “Oh great! So John gets to adapt to a new baby and menopause at the same time!)


Her birth parents are African American. We have given much thought to this, and probably have thought a lot about most of the same questions that come to your mind. Let’s talk about it whenever you want to. This is a child whose birth mother has chosen against abortion. I have longed for years to be pro-life in this way. Now a beautiful little girl needs a home and a family, and to have a grandmother who loves and enjoys her will be an immeasurable gift for her.


I’m so excited I’m hardly good for anything, and it’s only getting greater! Barnabas and Abraham are really eager, even thought it means moving into the same bedroom.


Please pray for the little girl that we hope will be our daughter. And please pray for us. It’s an amazing, mind-boggling thing to decide to be parents to a baby now when we are an age more likely to be grandparents. We’ll need booster talks from you along the way, I expect!


If you have any thoughts or questions that you want to talk about, or just want to think out loud, please call us.

I love you,
Noel

I emailed instead of calling to give her time to process the unexpected information before we talked. I wasn't sure how she'd respond to the idea of transracial adoption. But the email had hardly had time to land in her inbox before my phone was ringing.

"What's all this 'let's talk about it' business? This is wonderful news. I can't wait to run down the hill and tell Pamela. A new granddaughter! I can't wait!"

I love you, Mother. Thank you for welcoming with love every one of the grandchildren God has given you.
(to be continued)


15 comments:

Karen said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Karen said...

What a precious story!
And what a precious gift from God our children's Grandparents are . . . we are also thankful for Grandparents who have welcomed Grandchildren into their fold no matter their start in life or color of skin!

Dan the Wretched Man said...

what a wonderful story, John!!! This heart warming little story reminds me of the spiritual sense of things, and about how our Father in Heaven adopts us as His children from all races, nations, colors!

Thank you so much for your encouraging stories and God-centered ministry!

God's richest blessings to you and your family and its newest member! :)

Hannah Beth said...

>>I have longed for years to be pro-life in this way.

YES! Adoption has long been on my heart, and is slowly starting to become a reality 18 months into our young marriage, and for this reason I think God is making it plain to me that a domestic adoption is the right avenue for us. If we long for abortion to be eradicated; for the horrific reality of it to be made plain so that it's just not even an option, then let's put our hearts & our lives where our mouths are and be there to parent when others cannot.

Thank you for sharing your adoption story. I thank God for you and Dr. Piper!

Jane said...

This brings a tear to my eye. What a wonderful mother and a precious daughter!

Larry Rockwell said...

After having two girls and at the age of 49, living in a third world country, we were providentially given the opportunity to adopt a young Quechua boy who had been abandoned and left next to a river near the outskirts of a small Quechua mountain village high in the Andes of Peru. His life in the outside world would have thought to be ended as he was only two days old when found. We received when he was 10 days old. Our son, Jonathan Elliot Chaski Rockwell is a testimony of God's sovereign grace both in his life and ours. Perhaps he is one of the greatest testimonies we can share to those we minister among as missonaries. May the Lord bless his adopted children form every race!

Jamie said...

I'm crying as I read your post, and I want to say thank you to you and your husband, as you were a great influence in our own decision to adopt at ages 45 and 46. What a joy and a blessing it has been!

Christa said...

Why does Mother's response not surprise me at all?

Shannalee said...

What a beautiful story of grace and of love. Thank you for sharing it, and happy birthday to your mother today!

shannon said...

I am very much enjoying reading this story. My husband and I have adopted 3 kids transracially, all African American. We go to First Presbyterian Church in Augusta, GA. As would be expected, the church has been more than supportive. But the awesome thing about transracial adoption is that it is a little slice of heaven right here on earth. God created color and thinks it is beautiful; but in Heaven, we are all just souls worshipping the same God. Here in our home, we are all children of the Lord, souls he created to worship and bring glory to himself. We are family and I wouldn't have it any other way.

Beth said...

I'm enjoying hearing your story of adoption. We are in the process of adopting twin boys while we serve here in the Philippines. We've had them since they were 9 weeks old. Now they are two. I turn 50 next year and at the age many friends have grandchildren I have toddlers - high schooler! God is so faithful. Happy Birthday to your Mom.

Amy said...

As someone who is a big fan of your books and your husband's books, I am loving this series! I have two adopted Tanzanian children myself.

Dolapo said...

Waoh! I love this story. Adoption is sometimes seen has a last option for infertile couples in my country but you have done this as a love gesture. I admire your family and love your mother already. I will definitely adopt a child one day so i am sure i have a good mentor in you. God bless

Dolapo said...

Waoh! I love this story. Adoption is sometimes seen has a last option for infertile couples in my country but you have done this as a love gesture. I admire your family and love your mother already. I will definitely adopt a child one day so i am sure i have a good mentor in you. God bless

Terry said...

I love this story. My wife and I had similar reservations about how our parents would react when we adopted our African American son. Our parents responded in a similar way to your mother.